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No Mas FARC - Praga

Abych potpořil aktivity proti FARC v Kolumbii, tak jsem na YouTube nahral toto video. http://youtube.com/bozskyfilip

Video bylo vytvořeno pro akci NO MAS FARC - PRAGA 4. 2. 2008

Další informace o akci jsou na http://www.colombiasoyyo.org/
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